Forced settlements

Forced settlements
In the early 1920s the USSR began forced resettlement of people. This increased in the 1930s and 1940s. In the late 1920s and in the 1930s this involved the resettlement of the more successful farmers („kulaks") to the northern regions of Russia, to Siberia and the Far East. In the second half of the 1930s it was the deportation of various ethnic groups – especially Polish and German – from the border regions of the USSR. In the 1940s there were mass deportations from the western regions of the USSR, especially in 1941 from Moldavia, Byelorussia and the occupied Baltic States.

During World War II there were mass deportations of the Volga Germans, of Finns, Greeks, Chechens, Crimean Tatars, Bulgarians, Kurds, and others. Deportation of people from the Baltics to distant regions of the USSR continued from 1946 to 1952.

According to data from Russian historians, more that 6 million people were deported from the 1920s to 1952. In Latvia in 1941 and 1949-1952 the Soviet occupation regime deported approximately 60,000 people. In June 1941 alone 15,443 people from Latvia were deported, of whom more than 5,000 were arrested and incarcerated in forced labour camps. In March 1949 a total of 44,271 people were deported from Latvia, and an additional 513 after that.