Communist propaganda

Communist propaganda
The Soviet occupation regime used propaganda to coerce the public to accept Communist ideology. Propaganda was everywhere – in the press, the arts, science and education. It was also visually everywhere in the workplace, on the street, as well as in cultural, educational and even medical establishments. During the Stalin years the central theme was glorification of Stalin as leader. Other popular themes were the leading role of the Communist Party, friendship among the Soviet peoples, the USSR military might, and the superiority of the socialist system over capitalism.

Literature, the arts, education, social sciences, and especially history were also part of the communist propaganda. To ensure that all people would be exposed to information saturated with ideology, special speakers and agitators were trained. They addressed mass rallies, held lectures at places of work and elsewhere. Prior to elections they even visited people at home.

Particular attention was devoted to instilling the Soviet ideology in children and youths. The belief was that the making of a real Soviet patriot – a builder of Communism – had to begin in early childhood. Kindergartens and schools were decorated with red flags, slogans, and portraits of Communist Party leaders. Children lauded the Communist leaders and social order in songs and poems. Various activities were designed to instil Soviet patriotism, collectivism and Communist dogma. Children's and youth organisations – Little Octobrists, Pioneers, Young Communist League – were assigned a special role in „political education". In the early post-war years these organisations did not reach all the young people, but the numbers participating increased each year.